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Klinsmann refutes Bradley's claim he was jockeying for his job

WASHINGTON — U.S. national team head coach Jurgen Klinsmann has denied his predecessor Bob Bradley's claim that he was "jockeying" for his job in 2010.

In his introductory press conference with Swansea City, Bradley claimed Klinsmann was after his job in 2010 when he was working for ESPN during the World Cup.

"I'm glad that Jurgen said some nice things now. When he did commentary on the 2010 World Cup, he was already jockeying for the job," Bradley said. "I shut my mouth, continued to support the team because I of course want to see the team do well, Michael [Bradley's son] is the captain. So if [Klinsmann] said something in a nice way I appreciate it and if at some point he chooses to try to work outside the U.S., I wish him the best."

Bradley: Klinsmann was 'jockeying' for my USA job in 2010​

Speaking to reporters on Monday, Klinsmann denied Bradley's claim.

"It’s simply not true," Klinsmann said. "I could have taken the job in 2006, I could have taken it in 2010 and then we got together again in 2011 and we figured out a way to make this happen so I was not jockeying anything."

Klinsmann turned down the U.S. position following the 2006 World Cup. U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati reportedly approached Klinsmann after the 2010 World Cup as well, before re-signing Bradley. Following the USA's loss to Mexico in the 2011 Gold Cup final, Bradley was fired and Klinsmann was brought in.

After leaving the U.S. job, Bradley coached the Egypt national team, Norwegian club Stabaek and French side Le Havre before he was hired by Swansea City last week. He is the first American to coach in a top-five European league. 

"I wish Bob the very very best," Klinsmann said. "I think it’s a big moment having an American coaching a Premier League club. I think it’s huge. And he’s an awesome guy, he’s a good person and I’ll just keep my fingers crossed for him."