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Zidane returns to Real Madrid: Heynckes, Mourinho & the other comeback coaches

07:56 GMT 15/03/2019
Zinedine Zidane
Real Madrid opted for Zinedine Zidane over Jose Mourinho, we take a look at the other coaches have gone back to their old clubs.

  • Zinedine Zidane

    COMEBACK COACHES

    In a sensational twist to what has been an extraordinary season at Real Madrid, Zinedine Zidane has been appointed as head coach just 10 months after quitting the post.

    Zidane won three successive Champions League titles with Los Blancos, but their exit at the hands of Ajax in this season's edition of the tournament proved the final straw for Santiago Solari, who stepped in after Julen Lopetegui – Zidane's replacement – was sacked.

    But Zidane is not the only manager to have made a return to a former club. Here, we take a look at some of the major managerial comebacks.

     

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    JOSE MOURINHO (CHELSEA)

    Jose Mourinho announced his arrival at the very summit of world football during his first spell at Chelsea between 2004 and 2007, winning the Premier League title in his first two seasons.

    His second stint – which started in 2013 – saw him land the league title again in his second campaign before a spectacular implosion led to his dismissal in December of the 2015-16 season.

     

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    JUPP HEYNCKES (BAYERN MUNICH)

    Heynckes simply cannot say "no" to Bayern Munich.

    After an initial spell as head coach between 1987 and 1991, he returned to the Bavarian giants a further three times between 2009 and 2018. His most successful season came in 2012-13 when he guided Bayern to the Champions League, Bundesliga and DFB-Pokal.

     

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    LUIZ FELIPE SCOLARI (PALMEIRAS AND BRAZIL)

    Scolari has returned to previous jobs at both club and international level.

    He went back to Palmeiras in 2010 after a two-year stint there ended in 2000 and tried to replicate his World Cup win with Brazil in 2002 more than a decade later.

    However, his hopes of guiding the Selecao to a triumph on home soil in 2014 were cruelly dashed by a rampant Germany outfit, who thumped them 7-1 in the semi-final.

     

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    KENNY DALGLISH (LIVERPOOL)

    Liverpool legend Dalglish won three First Division titles and two FA Cups during his first stint at the club between 1985 and 1991 – success that was not to be repeated 20 years later.

    The Scot took over from Roy Hodgson in January 2011 but never came close to hitting the heights of his first reign and was ultimately dismissed in May 2012.

     

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    FRANCESCO GUIDOLIN (PALERMO)

    Guidolin initially joined Palermo midway through the 2003-04 season, leading the club to the Serie B title and back into the top-flight for the first time in 35 years.

    After a failed move to Genoa and an unremarkable spell at Monaco, Guidolin rejoined Palermo in May 2006. A run of two months without a win contributed to a difficult season, and Guidolin was sacked in April 2007, only to be re-appointed in May and then fired again at the end of the season.

    There was to be another twist – Guidolin unexpectedly re-appointed by Palermo for a record fourth time in November of the same year, but after only gaining 18 points from 17 matches, his final spell at the club was brought to an end in March 2008.

     

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    FABIO CAPELLO (AC MILAN AND REAL MADRID)

    Capello has enjoyed a stellar coaching career, and has not just one, but two comeback stints to his name. Having managed AC Milan as a caretaker in 1987, he spent five years at the helm of the Rossoneri between 1991 and 1996, when he left to join Real Madrid. However, a difficult relationship with Los Blancos fans resulted in him losing his job, despite Madrid edging out Barcelona to the title.

    A return to Milan followed, but his second spell failed to match his first, and he left a year later. In 2006, Capello returned to Madrid, but despite winning LaLiga once again, he failed to keep hold of his job.

     

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    LOUIS VAN GAAL (BARCELONA)

    Van Gaal spent three years at Barca between 1997 and 2000, winning LaLiga twice – as well as the Copa del Rey – but his clashes with the media and players alike saw him come under criticism.

    The Dutchman returned to Barcelona in 2002, signing a three-year contract, but inconsistent results and failed big signings resulted in him leaving by the end of January 2003, with Barca just three points above the relegation zone in 12th.

     

  • Roberto Mancini

    ROBERTO MANCINI (INTER)

    Mancini won three Serie A titles and two Coppa Italia trophies during his first stint at Inter, but on his comeback – in 2014 – found the club in a much more modest position.

    Inter finished 8th in his first season in charge, before claiming fourth place in 2015-16, as well as making it to the semi-finals of the Coppa. However, in a surprise move, Mancini left his role by mutual consent before the start of the 2016-17 season.

     

  • Marcello Lippi

    MARCELLO LIPPI (JUVENTUS)

    Lippi won Serie A and the Coppa Italia in his first season at Juventus, with a vibrant team spearheaded by Roberto Baggio and Fabrizio Ravanelli.

    More success followed in Turin over the next five years – including a Champions League triumph - before Lippi moved to Inter, though his tenure there lasted just one year.

    He was re-appointed at Juve, signing the likes of Pavel Nedved, Gianluigi Buffon and Lilian Thuram, and went on to win a further two Serie A titles, as well as guiding the Bianconeri to the 2003 Champions League final.

     

  • Leonardo Jardim

    LEONARDO JARDIM (MONACO)

    After three successful seasons at Monaco, a disastrous start to the 2018-19 campaign saw Jardim lose his job in October.

    His replacement, Thierry Henry, failed to spark a revival from a beleaguered Monaco outfit and was duly dismissed in January, paving the way for a quick-fire return.

    He has certainly improved on Henry's efforts, overseeing an upturn in form that has lifted Monaco outside the relegation zone.