Ex-Arsenal and Liverpool stars Dixon and Murphy among FA diving review panel

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Former Scotland and Aston Villa manager Alex McLeish will also form part of a 13-person group pieced together to rule on acts of simulation

Lee Dixon, Alex McLeish and Danny Murphy are among the former players and managers named to a 13-person panel that will rule on potential simulation offences this season.

A new rule announced in May allows the Football Association (FA) to retrospectively punish players for simulation or feigning injury in English football from 2017-18, with the pool who will rule on each case announced on Friday.

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One ex-match official, a former manager and an ex-player will review footage of each incident the FA believes warrants investigation and advise as to whether an offence has been committed, with a player subsequently charged only in cases where the trio reach unanimous agreement.

Retrospective action can be taken when an alleged offence has been missed by the referee and resulted in a penalty, a red card or one of two yellow cards that lead to a dismissal. Those found guilty will receive a two-match ban as punishment.

Each case will see the FA call upon three figures from their pool of 13, which includes Nigel Adkins, Rachel Brown-Finnis, Terry Butcher, Lee Dixon, Alex McLeish, Danny Murphy, Chris Powell and Trevor Sinclair as the ex-players and managers.

Keren Barratt, Steve Dunn, Mike Mullarkey, Alan Wiley and Eddie Wolstenhome are the five former officials named to the pool.

"If The FA believes that there may be a case to answer, a three-person panel consisting of one ex-player, one ex-manager and one ex-match official will be convened from the pool, subject to any conflicts of interest," read the governing body's statement.

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"Although attempts to deceive a match official by feigning injury or simulation is a cautionable offence, the fact that the simulation has succeeded in leading to a penalty and/or dismissal justifies a more severe penalty which is also intended to act as a deterrent.

"In the event that a charge is admitted or denied and later found proven, the Independent Regulatory Commission shall consider whether or not to rescind an associated caution or dismissal received by an opposing player as a result of the simulation."

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