How TS Galaxy boss Tim Sukazi saved Orlando Pirates striker Zakhele Lepasa's career

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The Mpumalanga-based side will look to the Bucs hitman when they take on Amakhosi at the Moses Mabhida Stadium

TS Galaxy club chairman Tim Sukazi has revealed how he saved Orlando Pirates striker Zakhele Lepasa's career.

The promising marksman was part of the Bucs squad that travelled to Zambia for a pre-season camp prior to the start of the current campaign.

However, Lepasa was loaned out to National First Division (NFD) side Stellenbosch just before the season started, but he struggled to establish himself at the Western Cape-based side.

"We took Zakhele Lepasa from Stellenbosch after he was sent there by Orlando Pirates - his parent club," Sukazi told Radio 2000.

Lepasa was released by Stellenbosch in January 2019 having made only four league appearances, while failing to find the net in the process.

The 22-year-old player was set to join ABC Motsepe outfit Pele Pele FC before Sukazi intervened and signed him on loan from Pirates.

"He was supposed to go play in the ABC Motsepe League for Pele Pele FC," he continued.

Lepasa has been an influential player in the Galaxy team under Dan Masalesa having impressively scored five goals in eight league appearances.

"But I decided to take him and offer him a chance. Look at him now," the former football agent said.

Lepasa announced himself to South Africa on Saturday when he scored a brace during Galaxy's 3-1 win over PSL side Lamontville Golden Arrows in the Nedbank Cup semi-final match.

"TS Galaxy is the only club in South Africa that has only South African players in the squad," Sukazi revealed.

"We don't have any foreign players, but surely we are going to have one in the future. But to reach this far with only South African players - it is good for Bafana Bafana," he concluded.

Lepasa took his tally to three goals in the Nedbank Cup and he will be looking to inspire Galaxy to victory over Pirates' arch-rivals Kaizer Chiefs in the Nedbank Cup final on May 18.

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