Goal.com - Home

thumbnail Hello,
Southampton

Founded: 1885

Address: Friends Provident St., Mary's Stadium, Britannia Road, Southampton, Hants SO14 5FP England

Phone: +44 0870 2200 000 -

Official URL: http://www.saintsfc.co.uk

Club History
Southampton were formed largely by ‘a bunch of healthy minded fellows’ from the Deanery FC, which had been established by schoolteachers in 1880. Most of the founders were connected with the YMCA (Young Men’s Christian Association) of St Mary’s Church. At the inaugural meeting held in November 1885, they adopted the name Southampton St Mary’s. The curate of the church was elected president of the newly formed football club. After an initial game on the County Bowling Club’s ground (adjacent to the Hampshire County Cricket Club Ground, which also opened in 1885), the players used a pitch on Avenue Road. But since a public footpath ran across the pitch, Southampton – inevitably nicknamed the Saints because of their affiliation – decided in 1886 to rent the Antelope Cricket Ground, named after the Antelope Inn and situated on the corner of Brintons Terrace and St Mary’s Road. Hampshire CCC had formed in the Antelope Inn and used the ground themselves between 1863 and 1885. In 1894 Southampton turned professional and joined the Southern League. But the inadequacies of their ground soon became clear, and the club moved to the new County Cricket Ground in 1896, paying rent of £200 a year to Hampshire CCC. In their first season there, 1896-97, Saints won the Southern League, formed a limited company and dropped ‘St Mary’s’ from their name. The following season they won the Southern League again and became the first non-League team since 1888 to reach the semi-final of the FA Cup, controversially losing to eventual winners Nottingham Forest. Later that year (1898), Southampton moved the short distance from the County Cricket Ground to the Dell – a tranquil, tree-fringed hollow containing a duck pond. The area was drained and levelled, the stream feeding the pond was culverted, a good playing surface was laid and stands erected, with steep terracing at both wedge-shaped ends of the pitch. The club were charged just £250 a year for an eight-year lease by landlord George Thomas, and the idyllically-named Dell was opened by the Mayor on 3 September 1898 with a Southern league fixture against Brighton United. In their first season at the Dell, Saints completed a hat-trick of Southern League title wins. In 2000 they reached the FA Cup Final for the first-time, losing 4-0 to Bury of the Football League. Two years later they were back at the Crystal Palace for another FA Cup Final, but after a 1-1 draw were beaten 2-1 in a replay by Sheffield United, at the same venue. The club endured some fraught financial times until 1920, when they became original members of the newly formed Third Division of the Football League. In 1922 they won promotion to the Second Division, where they remained until 1953. After winning the Third Division championship in 1960, Saints made it into the top flight as Second Division runners-up in 1966, under the guidance of former player, then manager and future director and president, Ted Bates. After an eight-year spell in the old First Division, Saints were relegated in 1974. By now Lawrie McMenemy was in charge, and in 1978 he took them back up among the elite. In between, he’d delivered the club’s finest hour as Southampton upset the odds by beating red-hot favourites Manchester United 1-0 at Wembley to win the FA Cup. They were at Wembley again in 1979 for League Cup final, but lost 2-3 to Brian Clough’s Nottingham Forest. Southampton have enjoyed continuous membership of the top flight since 1978, finishing second in the championship to Liverpool in 1984 and becoming founder members of the Premier League in 1992. In 2001 the club moved to a brand new home, The Friends Provident St Mary’s Stadium. Since 1985 they had a strong of managers including Chris Nicholl, Ian Branfoot, Alan Ball, Dave Merrington, Graeme Souness, Dave Jones, Glenn Hoddle, Stuart Gray and Gordon Strachan. In 2003 Strachan took them to another FA Cup Final, but Arsenal beat them 1-0 to retain the trophy. With the Gunners already in the Champions League, Saints qualified for the Uefa Cup but their campaign was short-lived. Midway through the 2003-04 season Strachan surprisingly announced that he was taking a break from football, and another Scot, Paul Sturrock, was appointed. Sturrock had done an excellent job at Plymouth Argyle and the club’s fans are hopeful that Sturrock will build on Strachan’s progress to consolidate the club as a top-ten Pemiership outfit.
Matches
  
Most Discussed
Top Scorers
Player Goals Penalties
Jay Rodriguez Jay Rodriguez
Striker
Southampton
17 0
Rickie Lambert Rickie Lambert
Striker
Southampton
12 3
Adam Lallana Adam Lallana
Midfielder
Southampton
10 0
Steven Davis Steven Davis
Midfielder
Southampton
4 1
G. Ramírez G. Ramírez
Midfielder
Southampton
3 0