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The former Barcelona and Scotland striker, who still lives in Catalunya, has backed Vicente del Bosque's side to overcome their rivals - despite the Real Madrid forward

EXCLUSIVE
By Pilar Suarez

Former Barcelona, Tottenham and Scotland striker Steve Archibald says Portugal's hopes of beating Spain rest on one man, Cristiano Ronaldo, but believes the Real Madrid forward will not be enough for Paulo Bento's side to claim victory in Wednesday's all-Iberian Euro 2012 semi-final in Donetsk.

Archibald was signed by Barcelona from Spurs in 1984 as a replacement for Diego Maradona and won La Liga for the Catalan club under Terry Venables.

The Glasgow-born forward, who also had a spell at Espanyol later in his career and moved back to Catalunya after hanging up his boots, is backing his adopted country to advance to the final of Euro 2012 - despite Ronaldo.

"Portugal have very good players," he told Goal.com in an exclusive interview. "And of course they have Cristiano Ronaldo who is in a great moment of form.

"But I don't think it will be enough because Spain will have possession of the ball and that will be an important factor. Sergio Ramos plays with Ronaldo at Real Madrid and [Gerard] Pique also knows him well. They know how good he is."

And despite La Roja's protestations that Portugal are not a one-man team, Archibald believes they are.

"I don't think Portugal have any other [decisive] players. Cristiano Ronaldo is everything, he makes the difference in his national team. Ronaldo is their top player."

The 55-year-old, meanwhile, claims criticism of Spain coach Vicente del Bosque is unfair.

He explained: "Spain are in the semi-finals, right? So who can criticise Del Bosque? He won the last World Cup and criticising him makes no sense."

And the Scot also analysed the much-maligned 'false nine' role which has caused controversy this summer.

"The area is like a box which never moves and the midfielders and inside forwards do not play thinking of a No.9, but focus on a point within that box where one of the players will arrive.

"If there is no No.9, there is nobody to mark, the defenders don't know what to do.

"The rival players run from deep to that point where the ball will arrive within the box and when you score, it is as if you had a No.9 anyway." 








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