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Cairos Technologies becomes third candidate for GLT contract

Cairos Technologies becomes third candidate for GLT contract

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FIFA has announced that a third goal-line technology (GLT) system has been approved and granted a licence, adding to the list of contenders bidding to secure the contract for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

FIFA has announced that a third goal-line technology (GLT) system has been approved and granted a licence, adding to the list of contenders bidding to secure the contract for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

Cairos Technologies, the parent company of German football data company Impire, has been approved by world football’s governing body after first commencing initiatives in this field back in 2000. Cairos’ system revolves around the usage of thin cables under the turf of the penalty area and behind the goal-line. They carry an electrical current generating a magnetic field which is identified by sensors within a football.

Cairos’ system was tested by the independent Swiss institute EMPA, and conducted its on pitch tests between December 18-20, firstly at Karlsruhe’s Wildparkstadion, and then at the club grounds of the regional side ATSV Mutschelbach, in Germany. A fourth system is also said to be currently under FIFA’s consideration.

GLT will be used at this year’s Confederations Cup and the 2014 World Cup after FIFA last week launched a tender process for proposals from companies interested in fulfilling the contract for its showpiece competitions. The two previously approved systems work using completely different technology. GoalRef creates the radio equivalent of a light curtain. Low magnetic fields are produced around the goal, and as soon as the ball, which is fitted with a compact electronic device, fully crosses the line, a minor change in the magnetic field is detected, thus allowing the exact position of the ball to be established. Hawk-Eye uses six to eight high-speed cameras set up at different angles at each end of the pitch to calculate the exact position of the ball. The data from the cameras is then transferred to video software creating a 3D graphic image of the ball’s trajectory.