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Swedish FA rallies behind UEFA plan after Euro 2016 experience

Swedish FA rallies behind UEFA plan after Euro 2016 experience

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The Swedish Football Association (SvFF) has become the latest governing body to state its interest in UEFA’s Euro 2020 plan, while Adidas has said it entered into its new kit partnership with the organisation due to its status as the country’s “biggest symbol”.

The Swedish Football Association (SvFF) has become the latest governing body to state its interest in UEFA’s Euro 2020 plan, while Adidas has said it entered into its new kit partnership with the organisation due to its status as the country’s “biggest symbol”.

UEFA formalised its ambitious plan for a Euro 2020 tournament spread across 13 cities on the continent on Friday. The ‘Euro for Europe’ vision foresees that matches will be split into 13 different packages, with 12 ordinary packages including three group matches and one knockout round (round of 16 or quarter-finals), and one package for the semi-finals and the final. A maximum of one venue per country will be permitted with each association allowed to present up to two bids, one for the ordinary package and one for the semi-finals/final. Each national association can decide to present the same city for these two bids or two different cities. The SvFF has backed the proposal after the frustration it endured in its joint bid for Euro 2016 with its Norwegian counterpart. The countries dropped the bid in December 2009 ahead of the award of the tournament to France in May 2010. SvFF chairman Karl-Erik Nilsson said a decision over a Euro 2020 bid will be made in the summer. “The dividing arrangement in this way makes it of course much easier to solve the infrastructure problem,” he said. ”It will be a completely different thing than when we sought to host the Euro  together with Norway and did not get the response needed from our politicians.”

Adidas succeeded Umbro as the new kit partner of the SvFF at the turn of the year. Brian Grevy, Nordic managing director for Adidas, told Reuters that the five-year deal fits perfectly with the German sportswear giant’s football strategy. “We may not have all of them but we always aim to have the biggest symbols,” he said. “This is the biggest symbol you can have in Sweden and we want to be associated as market leader here in football with the biggest symbol. It is the foundation for our company. We are in for market leadership in football, wherever we play in the world.”

The SvFF returns to Adidas following a previous long-term deal which expired in 2002. SvFF general secretary Mikael Santoft added: “Umbro is big but not as big as Adidas. But that’s not the main issue – it’s the brand name, the equipment and the money (that decide). It’s a good contract – in the beginning it’s five years, and it could be more than five years. In our FA we don’t change too often, 10 years is rather short-term in our minds.”

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