thumbnail Hello,

The government's decision to raise the levies to 75 percent next year could see many of the country's top teams refuse to play fixtures in protest.

A number Ligue 1 and Ligue 2 clubs are considering boycotting fixtures in the near future following the government's decision to raise tax on them to 75 percent.

The Union of Professional Football Clubs [UCPF] was reportedly unanimous in deciding it would oppose the pending increase on solidarity tax - to be applied next year - which is only applicable to clubs whose employees earn more than 1 million euros a year.

Olympique Lyonnais president Jean-Michel Aulas has confirmed that his club is among those mulling over the option of striking, which the 64-year-old believes is an "act of survival".

He told BUT: "I heard [Lille president] Michel Seydoux say he was prepared to file for bankruptcy if the tax were maintained. This is not a game, it should be understood that this is an act of survival in an environment where we had a lot of disappointment in the past. There is talk of a tax kills tax. If employers cannot pay this tax, there is no alternative. I prefer to see it as an alarm rather than a threat."

Asked when the boycott could take place, Aulas responded: "I am not qualified to answer that, but very soon, perhaps the coming days."

Saint-Etienne president Bernard Caiazzo, who is also the vice president of the UCPF, Bernard said that refusing to play fixtures is one of the options amid discussions among clubs.

"Boycott? Anything is possible. The tensions are high," he told reporters.

Le Havre president Jean-Pierre Louvel added that a decision is set to be made before the end of the month about how to counter the government's plans to bump levies on clubs.

"Different scenarios were mentioned," he said. "Professional clubs displayed a clear intention [to oppose the tax]. This will depend on the attitude and discussions with the government and the willingness of our clubs. We've decided to convene an extraordinary general meeeting for Oct. 24."

Related

From the web