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Noah Davis reports from South Africa.

RUSTENBURG, South Africa -- If the United States Men's National Team is going to advance to the quarterfinals of the 2010 FIFA World Cup, they are going to have to win without any South African fan support. The country's members are turning out in favor of Ghana, the last remaining nation from the host continent. 
"I was here for the USA-England game and the USA fans are great, but I live here, and I've got to do the African thing." Duncan Lee, who was born in Scotland but immigrated to South Africa, said at a bar across the street from Royal Bafokeng Stadium where the Stars and Stripes battle the Black Stars in the second round of the tournament. 
The winner of the match advances to the final eight. The two teams battled four years ago in Germany, with Ghana prevailing 2-1 on Stephen Appiah's penalty kick. The defeat sent the Red, White, and Blue home and the African side to their best finish ever. 
Saturday's game represents a chance at revenge for Americans who played in that game and fans who suffered through the loss. 
Kevin McNurney thinks the U.S. will emerge victorious. In fact, he had so much faith in the squad he found it unnecessary to arrive in time to see the first round. 
"I knew we would advance out of the group so I came a little bit late to the party, but I'm here to support the team now," he said.
The scene outside the stadium is more relaxed than it was before U.S.-England exactly two weeks ago, but there's still a bit of tension in the air. 
American supporters aren't bothered that residents of Rustenburg and other nearby cites will cheer for the opponents. 
"If I was South African, I would support Ghana as well," Californian John Arathoon said. "I've got no beef with that."
They do, however, take issue with Three Lions fans choosing to take up with the Africans. 
"I think it's funny is a lot of English are so arrogant they though they'd get No. 1 in the group and they got stuck coming here," Arathoon said. "Now they're supporting Ghana, which also makes sense in a way, but it's just funny. 
Londoner Jason Raine defended the decision of himself and his countrymates. 
"We're here in South Africa and I can't bring myself to support the US in a friendly rivalry way, not in a bad way."
Non-Ghanaian's rooting for the Black Stars are quick to point out their support doesn't say anything about the Americans team. The vast majority respects the American team and would support them under different conditions. 
"It's a positive decision, it's not a negative one," Lee McBride, a tourist from Belfast, said. "It's not that we don't like the States; it's that we like Ghana." 
Kutlwno Moagi, a South African volunteer sporting Ghanaian face paint, agrees. 
"It's more about supporting Africa, but if America makes it to the last eight, I will support them," he said. "It's nothing personal. I'm doing it for Africa."
Noah Davis (@noahedavis) covers the United States Men's National Team for Goal.com and is reporting from the World Cup in South Africa. 
RUSTENBURG, South Africa -- If the United States Men's National Team is going to advance into the quarterfinals of the 2010 FIFA World Cup, they are going to have to win without South African fan support. The country's members are turning out in favor of Ghana, the last remaining nation from the host continent. 

"I was here for the USA-England game and the USA fans are great, but I live here, and I've got to do the African thing." Duncan Lee, who was born in Scotland but immigrated to South Africa, said at a bar across the street from Royal Bafokeng Stadium where the Stars and Stripes will battle the Black Stars in the second round of the tournament. 

The winner of the match advances to the final eight. The two teams played four years ago in Germany, with Ghana prevailing 2-1 on Stephen Appiah's penalty kick. The defeat sent the Red, White, and Blue home and the African side to their best finish ever. 

Saturday's game represents a chance at revenge for Americans who played in that game and fans who suffered through the loss. 

Kevin McNurney thinks the U.S. will emerge victorious. In fact, he had so much faith in the squad he found it unnecessary to arrive in time to see the first round. 

"I knew we would advance out of the group so I came a little bit late to the party, but I'm here to support the team now," he said.

The scene outside the stadium is more relaxed than it was before U.S.-England exactly two weeks ago, but there's still tension in the air. 

American supporters aren't bothered that residents of Rustenburg and other nearby cites will cheer for the opponents. 

"If I was South African, I would support Ghana as well," Californian John Arathoon said. "I've got no beef with that."

They do, however, take issue with Three Lions fans choosing to take up with the Africans. 

"What I think it's funny is a lot of English are so arrogant they though they'd get No. 1 in the group and they got stuck coming here," Arathoon said. "Now they're supporting Ghana, which also makes sense in a way, but it's just funny."

Londoner Jason Raine defended the decision of himself and his countrymates. 

"We're here in South Africa and I can't bring myself to support the US in a friendly rivalry way, not in a bad way," he said.

Non-Ghanaian's rooting for the Black Stars are quick to point out their support doesn't say anything about the Americans team. The vast majority respects the American team and would root for them under different conditions. 

"It's a positive decision, it's not a negative one," Lee McBride, a tourist from Belfast, said. "It's not that we don't like the States; it's that we like Ghana." 

Kutlwno Moagi, a South African volunteer sporting Ghanaian face paint, agrees. 

"It's more about supporting Africa, but if America makes it to the last eight, I will support them," he said. "It's nothing personal. I'm doing it for Africa."

Noah Davis (@noahedavis) covers the United States Men's National Team for Goal.com and is reporting from the World Cup in South Africa. 

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