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The 21-year-old Mexican forward has been on loan with Sabadell in Spain's second tier but says that his parent club is following his development.

Mexican striker Ulises Davila is biding his time while in Spain's second division on loan from Chelsea, but the young prospect has reason to be encouraged.

Davila, a member of Mexico's Under-20 side that finished third in the 2011 FIFA U-20 World Cup, said that Chelsea is monitoring his progress at CE Sabadell regularly as he continues to develop in his second year abroad and that he is in a good place after adjusting from the move from the confines of Mexico's dometstic league to the rigors of the European game.

"There's a Chelsea rep who comes every 15 days to watch my home games," Davila told Goal.com. "Three weeks ago, the head scout came to watch the match against Barcelona B. They're paying attention, watching my matches and tell me when they observe something in my game. They let me know when they think I should improve certain aspects so I can keep growing. That gives me confidence so I can be better every time.

"I feel great right now, I'm recovering from a broken hand I sustained a couple of weeks ago, but I feel happy, I think I've gotten a lot better; this time in my career has served me in order to grow as a player."

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Davila, 21, signed a five-year contract with Chelsea after moving from Chivas de Guadalajara following the 2010-11 season, and he was sent on loan immediately to Vitesse in the Netherlands. Davila found playing time hard to come by, seeing the field in just three games and not scoring any goals.

His second loan, to Sabadell, has been more fruitful. In 27 games across all competitions, Davila has five goals as he continues his development, and he said that even though the Netherlands experience was not as productive on the field, it definitely helped lay the foundation for him to be able to adapt elsewhere.

"In the Netherlands the language and the weather, it takes you about six or seven months, then you adapt, and it serves you to get into the rhythm and speed of European football. When I came to Spain I felt better, more adapted," Davila said. "Coming here was easier, I liked it."

Davila has an eye on rejoining Chelsea and playing for the Blues' first team, but he is understanding of the club's plan for him and has adopted a patient approach to one day playing in the Premier League.

"I'm going through the process that they've set out for me," Davila said. "They want me to develop for two, maybe three years on loan. They've told me that being at a club like Chelsea is adapting to circumstances, growth, loan spells, learning abroad and being a player who wants to reach the top. When Chelsea tells me that it's convenient for me to go back, I will, and I hope I get to play with the first team soon."

Davila also knows that not playing for a top-flight side like Chelsea does not mean that his chances with the national team are neutralized. He used Mexican winger Javier Aquino, who moved from Cruz Azul to Villarreal during the winter transfer window as an example.

"You're always doubting yourself, if the league doesn't have a good level of play, for instance," Davila said. "But when you get here, you notice things. [Javier] Aquino was just an Olympic gold medalist last year and is playing for the full national team now, and he's here (at Villarreal). A player of that quality won't just go and play anywhere."

Even though Davila has not received a cap with El Tri's senior side, he is not discouraged and is fully aware of the competition at his position as he looks to accomplish his goal of representing his country at the top level.

"I've yet to have any contact with the national team, but I've said it before, the team is so competitive, it's hard to go now," Davila said. "I have to keep working, I can't demand a call up, the only thing I can do is work, be constant with my club and hope that springs me to the national team. That's my dream, being called up is a great honor and great motivation."

Andrés Corona Zurita contributed the reporting to this article.

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