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The Fifa president believes Uefa is unanimous with him over the issue - aside from their chief

Sepp Blatter has suggested that Michel Platini is the only person standing in the way of goal-line technology (GLT) being embraced on a global scale.

It has been confirmed that the Confederations Cup this summer will include GLT at a major international tournament for the first time, with a view to implementing it at World Cup 2014 - if everything goes according to plan.

However, the Uefa chief has repeatedly stated his opposition to the change in rules regarding referees being assisted by technology, but Blatter says Platini is in the minority.

“No, the difference of opinion isn't with Uefa. It's with Platini. Only Platini,” he told AS. “The federations, the referees, the players... everyone wants goal-line technology.

“If Platini doesn't want it, that's down to him personally. But that will change.”

It is common knowledge that Blatter’s opinion on GLT altered significantly after he witnessed Frank Lampard’s ‘ghost goal’ for England against Germany at the last World Cup, and the Swiss revealed his thought process after the Three Lions’ defeat.

“Yes, that day I saw things clearly. The ball was a long way over the line,” he added. “I had a difficult night after that incident. I was overwhelmed.

“And I said to myself 'If we find an infallible system, one that avoids at least 99 per cent of all ghost goals, then we'll accept it.' Now we have various valid systems at our disposal.

“I can confirm that there will be goal-line technology - either Hawk-Eye or an alternative system - at the Confederations Cup.”

Blatter also dismissed any suggestion that officials would not want GLT in place in the future and he hopes that the system will be embraced with open arms.

“All the referees applaud this kind of assistance, because ghost goals are the type of mistake that follows them for the rest of their lives,” he continued.

“They're what many referees are remembered for. If you make a mistake with a card or a penalty... but not seeing a goal is serious. That's why the referees will accept the help of technology as long as it is infallible.”

The Fifa chief also reiterated his stance that penalties should be avoided at all costs in a World Cup final, but he was unable suggest an alternative at this stage.

Blatter said: “I think [replaying a final] is a good idea, but I don't know if it'll be possible. It isn't easy, because the final should be decided on the day that was scheduled.

“But we hope to find a solution that avoids the need for penalties in the World Cup final. Why? Because penalties go against the essence of football. They turn a team sport into a one-on-one duel.

“On the other hand, it's true that penalties are good for television because the viewing figures go through the roof when there's a shoot-out.”

In previous years reigning world champions Spain would have automatically booked their place at Brazil 2014 as a result of lifting the World Cup, before that ruling was altered over 10 years ago and it is a decision Blatter stands by to this day.

He concluded: “It's a move we made in 1998, after the World Cup in France. The decision was taken at the request of the countries who had won the competition.

“They didn't want to go four years without competitive football, which is what would have happened if they had been given automatic qualification.

“We know that Spain are currently in a tricky position and that they could face a play-off to qualify for Brazil 2014. But Spain are the world champions and they have enough quality to qualify as group winners.”

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