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Ahead of the teams' Confederations Cup clash on Thursday, Goal takes a look at the big differences between the two nations - on and off the football field

ANALYSIS
By Ben Hayward & Chris Rizzitelli

Little and large, big versus small, David versus Goliath: the meeting between Tahiti and Spain on Thursday sees a small island nation pit their wits and their skills against the greatest international team around - and perhaps the best of all time.

Tahiti and Spain are very different places. Separated by thousands of kilometres, cultural differences, language and just about everything else, the nations also have very distinct stories on the football field.

So ahead of the teams' meeting in the Confederations Cup in Brazil on Thirsday, Goal takes a look at the huge differences between the two - on and off the pitch.

Tahiti
Spain

        

            
             
1990 FIFA MEMBER SINCE
1904
138 CURRENT FIFA RANKING
1
0 WORLD CUP PARTICIPATIONS
13
1 MAJOR TOURNAMENT WINS
5
30-0 v COOK ISLANDS (1971) BIGGEST WIN
13-0 v BULGARIA (1933)
10-0 v NEW ZEALAND (2004) BIGGEST DEFEAT
7-1 v ITALY (1928) & ENG (1931)
     
TAHITI & SPAIN: AN OVERVIEW
Tahiti only became a member of Fifa in 1990, but had already won the South Pacific Games four times by then (in 1966, 1975, 1979 and 1983). Another South Pacific Games title was added in 1995, before the island's first major international tournament success, the OFC Nations Cup title last year - which saw Tahiti qualify for the Confederations Cup. 

Tahiti's biggest win was a 30-0 hammering of Cook Islands in 1971, although they were not a Fifa member at the time. Since affiliation, the nation's greatest victory is an 18-0 thrashing of American Samoa in 2000.

Spain became a member of Fifa in 1904 but did not play an official match until 1920. La Roja have claimed five major international tournaments in their history: three European Championships (1964, 2008, 2012), one World Cup (2010) and one Olympic Gold Medal (1992).

Due to their spectacular success in recent years, Spain sit on top of the current Fifa world rankings, 137 places above their opponents on Thursday.

267,000 POPULATION 47,270,000
4,167 square kilometres TOTAL AREA
504,782 square kilometres
Faa'a (29,851 inhabitants) LARGEST CITY Madrid (3.234m inhabitants)
€4.26 billion GDP
€1.15 trillion
€23,400 AVERAGE ANNUAL WAGE
€26,856
13% UNEMPLOYMENT RATE
25%
French OFFICIAL LANGUAGE
Spanish
250,000 in 2012 VISITORS PER YEAR 57.7 million in 2012
Va'a (outrigger canoeing) NATIONAL SPORT Football
     
TAHITI & SPAIN: CHARACTERISTICS
Football is popular in Tahiti but va'a, which is also known as outrigger canoeing, is the national sport. French is the only official language on the island, although Tahitian and English are also spoken. In Spain, Catalan, Valencian, Basque, Galician and a number of other languages are all still in wide use.

Tahiti has a modest population of 267,000, compared to Spain's 47 million. The average wage is less in Tahiti, too, although unemployment is much lower than in crisis-hit Spain.

One (Marama Vahirua) PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALLERS
Around 800
None PROFESSIONAL CLUBS
120
AS Dragon, AS Tefana MOST POPULAR TEAMS
Real Madrid, Barcelona
Stade Hamuta (10,000 capacity)  LARGEST STADIUM
Camp Nou (98,000)
Xavier Samin (29) MOST INTERNATIONAL CAPS
Iker Casillas (146)
Steevy Chong Hue (10) MOST INTERNATIONAL GOALS
David Villa (53)
Marama Vahirua (€1m in 2007) MOST EXPENSIVE PLAYER
Fernando Torres (€58m in 2011)
Marama Vahirua (€100,00 a year) HIGHEST EARNER
Xavi, Iniesta (€7.5m per year)
€800,000 ESTIMATED SQUAD VALUE
€600 million
     
http://u.goal.com/135700/135791.jpg
       FOOTBALL IN TAHITI & SPAIN
Tahiti have only one professional footballer, Marama Vahirua, and he has only just made his debut for the islanders. There are no professional clubs in Tahiti, either, and the nation's squad has an estimated value of just €800,000 - with half of that made up by Vahirua. By contrast, the Spain squad is valued at an incredible €600m or maybe more.

The largest stadium in Tahiti, meanwhile, hold only 10,000 spectators, while the nation's entire population could not even fill Spain's biggest arena (Camp Nou) three times.

http://u.goal.com/135700/135791.jpg

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