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Striker's parent insists her son is not prejudiced against black people and says the use of the word 'negro', which was aimed at Frenchman, has no racist connotations in Uruguay

The mother of Liverpool star Luis Suarez says she fears for her son’s safety after he was found guilty of racially abusing Manchester United's Patrice Evra.

Sandra Diaz insists her son is not racist after the Uruguayan received an eight-match ban and a £40,000 fine after the FA found him guilty of using racist language towards the defender.

The FA released the written reasons behind its ruling, which included the striker admitting he had called the Frenchman 'negro' during the game at Anfield in October.

"I believe in God, who is the only judge we have," Diaz told Uruguayan newspaper El Observador.

"These type of situations have occurred in many games and nothing has ever happened. I laugh when they say he is a racist, because he isn't like that. I know my children but I am worried now when I see him on the pitch; he will have to take care of himself.

"It scares me when he comes up against someone 'coloured' they are going to go after him more."

She added: "We are all waiting to see what happens with the appeal. It's a real shame because it had been an impeccable year for him.

"I know my son. I recognise that he needs to tone down his temper, for example, for the signs he made to the [Fulham] fans. But don't treat him as a racist. One thing is his conduct and another thing is to accuse him of being racist. That has nothing to do with it."

Not only has Diaz laughed off the speculation that her son is racist, she also claims he used to have black friends in his time at Uruguayan club Nacional and says the use of the word 'negro' has no racist connotations there.

She continued: "I am very concerned about his future. There is a stain left.

"He has everything ahead of him, [but] this will make him stronger and that will help him. Here it's very common [the use of 'negro'], it's not racist. We are different.

"He was very good friends with [Pablo] Caballero at Nacional, and he virtually lived with us at home. And we said to him all the time 'negro over here', 'negro over there'... I find it funny the English are like that."

She added: "Liverpool had a resurgence and Luis played very good games. He became very well known. They lifted themselves up thanks to him.

"[And] the 'why are you touching me, Sudaca' [the alleged words of Evra] do not count [for anything]?"

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