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The first-team coach believes the system at Carrington is beneficial to the success of the Red Devil's senior team, developing youngsters into international caliber

Rene Meulensteen believes Manchester United are benefiting greatly by developing youngsters from an early age and bringing them through the youth system.

The first-team coach introduced his philosophy at Carrington, developing the Coerver method that teaches schoolboys good habits, allowing them the flexibility to play in different roles.
 
And the hard work at United’s youth system appears to be paying off, seeing the likes of Tom Cleverley and Danny Welbeck rise up the pecking order and establishing strong roles in Sir Alex Ferguson’s first team.

"I worked with Wiel (Coerver) myself and I was very fortunate to do that," he told Manutd.com.

"That provided the background, the basis of the philosophy which I've taken on board and expanded it so it has become my philosophy, engrained with all the other important aspects.

"I'm just a very strong believer in it because the best players out there in the world, past and present, have given us that information.

“If you go back in time to George Best, Johan Cruyff and Diego Maradona up to all of the best players now, Lionel Messi, Cristiano Ronaldo, Wayne Rooney, they've got the ability to take players on and beat them. It's not only important for the team, it's very exciting for the game itself."

Meulensteen believes educating the youngsters in this way provides the senior level side with massive benefits when they are asked to fulfil their roles later in their career.

"In the beginning, the kids are young and just respond to the environment you create for them. They don't know what is good or bad, they just enjoy it or hate it but they will do it.

"If I had kids climbing the fence up and down all day, they don't know why they're doing it.

"But, when they get to 18-20, they realise it's no good and they should've worked on their skills.

"When they've gone through that, it has become second nature and that's why skill development is so important in the early age groups because it can become second nature by 16, 17 and 18.

“If a player is going to be a defender, midfielder or attacker, they also know it's no problem because they think if I'm under pressure, I've got the skills to deal with it and that is the big difference."

The rise of Cleverley and Welbeck into United’s first-team this season has provided evidence that the system is working and will continue to produce players of an international calibre for Ferguson.

"It is, more and more, an exciting time for me. It's started with Welbeck and Cleverley because, when I came in, they were 10 or 11. Now they've featured in the first team team and, just underneath, there's the likes of Larnell Cole, Jesse Lingard, Ryan Tunnicliffe, Tom Thorpe, Ezekiel Fryers and the Keanes [William and Michael].

"They've all been on the skills journey and are now coming back to Reserves training and working with the first team and they see the same coach, sending the same messages.

“They say: 'Do you remember?' and it's a case of: 'Yes, so now you can tell why we did it. It should make you a player who can make a difference for us'."

Rene Meulensteen believes Manchester United are benefiting greatly by developing youngsters from an early age and bringing them through the system.

The first team coach introduced his philosophy at Carrington, developing the Coerver method that teaches schoolboys good habits, allowing them the flexibility to play in different roles.

And the hard work at United’s youth system appears to be paying off, seeing the likes of Tom Cleverly and Danny Welbeck rise up the pecking order and establishing strong roles in Sir Alex Ferguson’s first team.

"I worked with Will myself and I was very fortunate to do that," he told Manutd.com

"That provided the background, the basis of the philosophy which I've taken on board and expanded it so it has become my philosophy, engrained with all the other important aspects.

"I'm just a very strong believer in it because the best players out there in the world - past and present - have given us that information.

“If you go back in time to George Best, Johan Cruyff and Diego Maradona up to all of the best players now, Lionel Messi, Cristiano Ronaldo, Wayne Rooney, they've got the ability to take players on and beat them. It's not only important for the team, it's very exciting for the game itself."

Meulensteen believes educating the youngsters in this way provides the senior level side with massive benefits when they are asked to fulfil their roles later in their career.

"In the beginning, the kids are young and just respond to the environment you create for them," he explained. "They don't know what is good or bad, they just enjoy it or hate it but they will do it.

"If I had kids climbing the fence up and down all day, they don't know whey they're doing it.

"But, when they get to 18-20, they realise it's no good and they should've worked on their skills.

"When they've gone through that, it has become second nature and that's why skill development is so important in the early age groups because it can become second nature by 16, 17 and 18.

“If a player is going to be a defender, midfielder or attacker, they also know it's no problem because they think if I'm under pressure, I've got the skills to deal with it and that is the big difference."

The rise of Cleverly and Welbeck into United’s first-team this season has provided much needed evidence that the system is working and will continue to produce players of an international calibre for Ferguson.

"It is, more and more, an exciting time for me. It's started with Welbeck and Cleverley because, when I came in, they were 10 or 11. Now they've featured in the first team team and, just underneath, there's the likes of Larnell Cole, Jesse Lingard, Ryan Tunnicliffe, Tom Thorpe, Ezekiel Fryers and the Keanes.

"They've all been on the skills journey and are now coming back to Reserves training and working with the first team and they see the same coach, sending the same messages.

“They say: 'Do you remember?' and it's a case of: 'Yes, so now you can tell why we did it. It should make you a player who can make a difference for us'."

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