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Having been in the situation himself, the Mariners boss does not believe another man should be left in the limbo of a short-term national team appointment

Graham Arnold has cautioned Football Federation Australia against appointing a short-term Socceroos coach, and does not believe the job should be shared with A-League management duties.

Arnold, who guided the Central Coast Mariners to the title last season, is one of the Australian names in the frame to take over the national team from Holger Osieck, who was sacked after a 6-0 defeat away to France on Friday.

The hiring of a big-name foreign coach on an interim basis has also been mooted, but Arnold - who served as Guus Hiddink's assistant before taking over the national team in 2006 upon the Dutchman's departure - believes FFA should avoid a repeat of that scenario.

"It's time we looked at the big picture," he said after the Mariners drew 1-1 at home to Western Sydney in their season opener on Saturday.

"I was in the unfortunate position in 2007 to be an interim coach and it's not fun because you have got no power and the players know that.

"A part-time appointment or a short-term fix I don't think is the solution."

When asked if he or another A-League coach, such as Melbourne Victory's Ange Postecoglou, could balance managing both the Socceroos and a club side, Arnold expressed his misgivings.

"It would be very difficult," he said.

"When Guus Hiddink was here in the role and coaching PSV [Eindhoven] I had to do a lot of his work for him off the field and there is so much to organise and so much to do before a World Cup.

"I am then coaching against players who want to get in the national team, or Ange is coaching against players who want to get in the national team so their performances go through the roof."

Arnold however did not rule himself out of the running, and made his displeasure at Australia's recent woes clear.

"I didn't say that I wanted it or that I need it … I am a very proud Australian and I love the Socceroos and it's killing me watching those games and those results," he said.

"It would be an honour [to do the job again] if they look that way and they look down that pathway for Australian coaches."

"I have had ten years with the national team, I have had two World Cups, I have had 300 games sitting on the bench at national team level and I have obviously learnt a lot."

Tony Popovic also been mentioned as a candidate, but the Wanderers coach was quick the dismiss his chances of getting the call from FFA.

"Let's not even go there with that," he said.

"As a former Socceroo you want the national team to do well as I have been a part of it.

"I have been privileged to play for my country over 50 times and you cherish those moments and we are going through a tough time at the moment and I have got faith we will get it right."

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